A Project of CCT

The following papers summarize information about our professional development model, the process of developing the Math for All professional development materials, and findings from our research:  

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-04 at 6.43.24 PMDuncan, Teresa G. & O’Conner, R. A. (2016, April). Lessons Learned about Videotaping and Coding Classroom Observations. Paper presented in B. Moeller (chair), Math for All: Lessons Learned from Piloting an RCT in a Large Urban District, symposium conducted at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Washington, D.C., April 10, 2016.      

 

Moeller et al 2016 coverMoeller, B., Dubitsky, B., Cohen, M., Marshall, N., McLeod, M., & Rothschild, K. (2016, April). Math for All Pilot Study: Lessons Learned about Recruiting Schools and the Implementation of the Professional Development
. Paper presented in B. Moeller (chair), Math for All: Lessons Learned from Piloting an RCT in a Large Urban District, symposium conducted at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Washington, D.C., April 10, 2016.    

 

TC Report Dec 2015 CoverHorton, D., Beckwith, J., & Meier, E. (2015). Math for All: Assessing the Efficacy of a Professional Development Program for Elementary School Teachers. Teacher and Administrator Interviews. New York: Center for Technology and School Change, Teachers College, Columbia University.        

 

Moeller, B., & Dubitsky, B. (2014). Making Standards-Based Mathematics Education Accessible to Students with Disabilities.Urban Perspectives20(1), 1-8.

 

Moeller, B. & Dubitsky, B. (2008). Mathematics for All Project. Final report prepared for the National Science Foundation. New York: Bank Street College of Education.

 

Meier, E. B., Powell, K. A., Hollands, F. M., Mineo, C. M., Moeller, B., & Dubitsky, B. (2008). Math For All: An Opportunity to Develop Our Civic Responsibility to Inclusion Students. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New York, NY, March, 2008.

 

Meier, E. B., Powell, K. A., Hollands, F. M., Moeller, B., & Dubitsky, B. (2007). Preparing Teachers to Teach Mathematics in Inclusion Classrooms: A Multimedia Case Based ApproachPaper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New York, NY, April, 2007.

 

The Math for All (MFA) professional development program has been extensively pilot- and field-tested in collaboration with researchers from the EDC|Center for Children & Technology and School Change at Teachers College, Columbia University (Meier et al., 2008).

Results from this research provided evidence of the feasibility and usability of the MFA program in a variety of settings, as well as its impact on teachers’ knowledge, skills, and teaching practices that prior research has associated with improved learning outcomes for students with and without disabilities. Teachers improved their understanding of individual students’ strengths and needs and of how to select instructional strategies to make math lessons more accessible to students with different strengths and needs without changing the standards-based goals of the lessons. Classroom observations confirmed that teachers who participated in the MFA PD were observing individual children, adapting math lessons to better meet students’ strengths and needs, and incorporating a range of instructional strategies into their classroom practice.

Through subsequent research studies, we were able to demonstrate that the program still had a significant effect on teachers’ knowledge and classroom practices when it was implemented by facilitators other than the program developers, a finding that attests to the scalability of the program. This study also allowed us to gather some initial data to examine the potential impact of the MFA program on student learning outcomes. We found that the percentage of students who scored at or above the proficiency level increased after being taught by teachers who participated in the professional development, with an average increase of 8.7%. For seven out of nine cohorts, this increase was greater than the average change in proficiency rates for the same grade levels within their state, which ranged from 3.5% to 5%.

For more details on the MFA research, please see Math for All Research Base.

The Mathematics for All Project final report, prepared to the National Science Foundation, is available here: MFA Final Report